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Cake day: June 13th, 2023

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  • There’s a huge difference between losing your temper when controlling a digital go-kart versus a real-life one-ton vehicle.

    It’s a good first step that you recognize this is a problem, but it needs to be followed up with actions you can take when it occurs. In the case of driving, if your impulse is to follow the driver who pissed you off, you need to get off the road at the very first safe opportunity (a side street, a freeway exit, a parking lot, whatever) to give yourself a chance to cool down and both mentally and physically distance yourself from the situation. It doesn’t matter how much of a jerk the other party is (again, unless they are actively putting people in danger, in which case you should be pulling over to call emergency services); when you’re on the road the only thing you should be concerned with is your own behavior. There is zero justification for escalation; you are not teaching the other person a lesson, you are putting people’s lives at risk over a minor slight.

    I used to work in transportation and you wouldn’t believe the horror stories. Please don’t underestimate how quicky and easily road rage situations can turn ugly; it’s never worth it.



  • This response is literally road rage. (Given the discussion about literally vs figuratively elsewhere in the thread, I genuinely mean literally).

    Road rage is dangerous for you, the other driver, and other bystanders on the road. Please reassess how you respond to perceived aggressions and slights while driving. The only time you should escalate is if another road user is actively putting others in harm’s way (e.g. DUI) and even then the best course of action is probably calling your local authorities for them to handle the situation. If the situation is not severe enough to warrant a 911 call, your focus should be on de-escalation (before it turns into a situation that is).





  • No, property tax is basically the only direct motivation in place for home owners to vote for politicians and policies that will keep housing affordable for future generations and people who don’t already own a home. Otherwise why wouldn’t home owners want to see housing prices skyrocket in value if there’s no financial downside for them (and a giant payout when they do sell)? As mentioned in other comments, some states have tried property tax caps, and the result is creating a system of haves and have nots based entirely around who was lucky enough to buy into the market before it shot to the moon.



  • I was caught a bit off guard by the time jump, but I think it was a good call. Too many stories try to shove character development into too short a time frame, making it feel forced and plot-driven rather than a natural change; the development that needed to happen for the characters of LO (especially re: Persephone) was the kind that takes years, so I’m glad the story gave it years. Plus to all but the youngest gods, what’s a decade, really? The biggest thing for me was it resolved the Persephone/Hades age gap to be way less icky, and demonstrated that the two were truly in love and not just caught up in a momentary infatuation.



  • Ten or fifteen years ago I almost certainly would not have found the girls as bland and annoying as I do watching this today. I think a combination of having read/watched dozens of series with similar characters, as well as aging out of the teenage/young adult demographic, made me completely uninterested in these characters… to the point that watching TEW felt like I was unironically “watching it for the plot”: I’m just here for the trains, bizarre setting, and surreal vibe!

    This is entirely a matter of opinion, of course. However of the people I know aged 30 and up who watch anime, I don’t think most of them would particularly enjoy the girls, and most likely would shy away from the series specifically because of their presence. That’s generally the type of audience I write reviews for; these reviews are posted to the “Animation and Comics after 30” community first and cross-posted here when relevant. Once upon a time I was into “cute girls find cute things series” (I re-watched Lucky Star at least once), but tastes change as you age, and while some older viewers may still enjoy these characters, I definitely did not.

    One series I am really interested in this season is Dead Dead Demon’s Dededededestruction, in part because the teenage girl cast don’t look or act like stereotypical anime girls. Compared to most anime girls, it’s almost as if the manga author pulled an Alien and wrote the characters to be gender neutral, since they often act more how I’d expect teenage boys in anime to act. Watching this series reminds me of watching the live action series Derry Girls: here’s a cast that compared to most media feels like a real-life group of teenagers, awkward and weird. I don’t think the manga quite translates to the animated format, but that’s a topic for a separate review.


  • Do you mean a list of series (anime series?) that I would consider to be four out of five stars or better? That’s generally the purpose of my reviews: any time I finish a series I write a review from the perspective of an older viewer/reader, for the sake of other older viewers/readers.

    I do have a running list of series I’ve enjoyed, but the problem is it’s a long list spanning decades, and my opinions have almost certainly changed from when I was a teenager, plus some series that were amazing when they came out are only just okay nowadays. In other words, I don’t think my running list is that accurate anymore, especially for any pre-2014 titles. I do try to go back and rewatch and re-rate series, but the nostalgia factor makes that difficult to do objectively. Given that MyAnimeList and other rating sites exist, my explicit goal here is to rate series specifically as an older, somewhat jaded fan that’s losing interest in animation/comics but still enjoys the medium and wants to help other fans “sift through the garbage” as you put it. So I don’t think my old opinions of shows I haven’t seen in years are very valuable for that purpose.

    If there’s community interest, at some point I might make a running list of everything I’ve reviewed and the score for each, but at the moment the community is pretty small and there aren’t that many of my reviews to sift through. Plus I’m a tough rater, so while I’d generally recommend anything 4+ stars to most anybody, there’s a lot of good 3+ series that I think are still enjoyable for audiences willing to overlook some flaws (like I describe in this review of TEW).


  • fireweed@lemmy.worldOPtoAnimeReview: Train to the End of the World
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    12 days ago

    I’ll add in that Kino’s Journey was originally a light novel series, キノの旅 (Kino no Tabi). I never actually saw the anime, but really enjoyed the light novels (I read them in Japanese; hopefully the English translation is equally good).

    I think Kino is a great series for anyone who enjoys dystopias and social commentary. It’s a bit like The Twilight Zone or Black Mirror with its episodic premise of “imagine if there were a society that functioned like [concept of the week]; wouldn’t that be interesting/weird/fucked up?” Definitely not your standard anime/light novel! And yes, the tone of TEW and Kino is completely different; as mentioned in another comment, the similarity is in the setting/premise of exploring different isolated communities that each have some bizarre unique feature.



  • fireweed@lemmy.worldOPtoAnimeReview: Train to the End of the World
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    12 days ago

    For sure, the tone of TEW is nothing like Kino (I only read the light novels, but I’m assuming the anime is similarly dark). However I thought the setting hit similar notes: visiting isolated city-state-like communities separated by vast, unpopulated expanses, each dramatically different from the others in some strange, unfortunate manner. I loved this world-building premise in Kino, and was happy to see it again but with a different twist in TEW.






  • This is actually discussed on the live-action animated film Wikipedia page.

    Since the late 1990s, some films have included large amounts of photorealistic computer animation alongside live-action filmmaking, such as the Star Wars prequels, The Lord of the Rings trilogy and the Avatar franchise. These films are generally not considered animated due to the realism of the animation and the use of motion-capture performances, which are extensively based on live-action performances by implementing actors’ movements and facial expressions into their characters. Roger Ebert said that “in my mind, it isn’t animation, unless it looks like animation.”

    Related note: I’m quite nostalgic for the mid-20th century live-action animation trend (even more so than the late-20th century puppet trend). If the characters are going to look fake regardless, the animated ones are way more expressive and, well, animated.



  • fireweed@lemmy.worldtoScience Memes@mander.xyzAspirations
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    17 days ago

    A major turning point in one’s academic journey is when you go from struggling to compose a lengthy and impressive essay to struggling to compose a concise and accessible essay (otherwise known as the “too-short-and-basic to too-long-and-pompous shift”). Sometimes this takes leaving academia and realizing that your masterpiece work doesn’t mean shit if no one bothered to read it.



  • fireweed@lemmy.worldtoAnimemesKami
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    18 days ago

    Japanese has significantly fewer sounds than many languages, so homonyms are inevitable. Thanks to kanji this isn’t much of an issue in written Japanese, but spoken Japanese (and Japanese written without the use of kanji) relies heavily on context.

    The alternative would be ridiculously long words. Example: the English word “extra” (five letters, two syllables) is pronounced “ekisutora” in Japanese (still five letters, but also five syllables); this is a result of every consonant needing to be followed by a vowel (except for “n” and a short list of compounds like “sh”). Additionally, Japanese only has five vowel sounds, plus a few that you can force out (e.g. “ka” can be slightly modified to “kya” to approximate the “a” sound in “cat”). Japanese also contains fewer consonant sounds than a number of other languages.